Soline Humbert writes…

When There Was No Room At The Church Inn And A Wise Woman Came With A Gift

Twenty five years ago today a friend of mine, a missionary sister returning from Africa, gave me a very special present with these words: ”It has long been gestating in you, but now the time has come for the birth. Rome is not ready, but you are.” As I opened the gift, I discovered a chalice and a paten. I was filled with awe and gratitude as my own discernment had led me to this realisation and I had prayed for a sign. This was the sign: A door had opened and the Holy Spirit was beckoning me forward. I used this chalice and paten to first preside at Eucharist on the Feast of the Epiphany. And since then, I have done so countless times and so have many other women in Ireland and around the world.

A new church is being born out of a dying one. The Spirit is calling us to be mothers and midwives. NOW.

Did the woman say, when she held him for the first time in the dark of a stable,

After the pain and the bleeding and the crying,

“This is my body, this is my blood”? … (Frances Croake Frank)

Yes, Mary did, and yes, we do.

Magnificat!

 

Soline Humbert

[This reflection was first shared on 27 December 2020 at the Catholic Women’s Council Liturgy, organised by the Indian Women Theologians Forum]

 

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2 Comments

  1. Soline Humbert says:

    December 28th also marked the 50th anniversary of the ordination to the priesthood of Ludmila Javorova in the underground Roman Catholic church in Czechoslovakia during the communist regime and persecution.
    This courageous, humble and faith-filled woman will be 89 this month. Her prophetic story was written up by Sr Miriam Therese Winter in a very moving book: Out Of The Depths, The Story of Ludmila Javorova Ordained Roman Catholic Priest. (available online at Veritas, the Irish catholic bishops’store!..)
    https://eewc.com/depths-story-ludmila-javorova/

  2. George Lynch says:

    From Irish Times 31/12/2020; Orla Muldoon, professor of psychology at University of Limerick, writing about the GAA
    “The Catholic Church, Fianna Fáil and the GAA were once described as the three pillars of the Irish state. Organisations that wove together the fabric of Irish society together. The power of the former two have been eroded. And their failure to engage and empower women is at the heart of their demise. This is the GAA’s moment. To survive it will have to live up to its own mission to support Gaelic games culture and life long participation for all, and not just for men and boys.”

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